Archive for the International Category

Greg Rodriguez-Giant Tom Leopard

Posted in Africa, Big 5, Big Game, International with tags on February 6, 2010 by thegreatwhitehunter

A few months ago I came across the photo of an exceptional Leopard harvested in Southern Africa.  The post highlighted the recovery of the Southern African Leopard and the size of the exceptional specimen.  As is often the case, the post generated its fair share of controversy  (see below).  Recently I came across the photo of a similarly impressive cat harvested by Greg Rodriguez while researching a recent Marco Polo Sheep post.

This exceptional animal was harvested by Greg in Namibia in May 2008.  Stretching the tape at eight feet one inches (8’1″), Greg’s tom is no trick photography.   Greg is an exceptional outdoorsman, photographer, outdoor and shooting writer and owner of Global Adventure Outfitters. In the course of his extensive travels, Greg researches the world’s best outfitters for international hunting.  Email Greg through his website to book your international hunt of a lifetime http://www.mbogo.net/contact.html or call at (281)494-2151.  Thanks Greg for use of the photo.

This Leopard in the photo below and appears larger than life, is probably about the same size as Greg’s tremendous cat. 

Harvested in Zambia, this behemoth shows the size and quality of older cats that can be harvested in Southern Africa.   Often times giant Leopard are able to attain their abnormal size by becoming cattle theives.  I have a hard time blaming them given my own love of a good ribeye or New York strip steak.  However, to the local farmers, the loss of a member of the herd can be devastating. As in North America, intelligent wildlife conservatin is the key to maintaining a proper balance.  http://thegreatwhitehunter.wordpress.com/2009/10/05/giant-leopard-big-five-trophy-of-a-lifetime/

South African Impala

Posted in Africa, Big Game, Friends and Family, International, Plainsgame with tags on January 28, 2010 by thegreatwhitehunter

An unexpected challenge, impala was giving me fits during my hunt last year in South Africa.  I had hunted hard for three days, without a single shot fired.

On the second day of the hunt, all three of the other hunters in camp had harvested an impala.  The most plentiful game animal in South Africa, there are an estimated 40 to 50 million impala in South Africa alone.  I was nonetheless excited about the prospect of harvesting a record book ram.  We had seen hundreds of impala, including several good rams over the three days.  However, a good shot had not presented itself.

Our hunt was taking place in the middle of the roar, breeding season for these sleek and wary animals.  The roar of a ram impala sounds much like a leapord roar.  Loud and agressive their call seemed such a stark contrast to their appearance, after three days I still was not used to the irony of the males’ call. Their call is only matched in their agressiveness as we saw countless younger males challenged with their life by the older males.  Perhaps the only animal I have seen fight so viciously is whitetail deer in North America.  Perhaps a result of their abundance, I couldn’t help ask myself why we couldn’t seem to close the deal on a trophy class impala. 

On the third day of impala hunting, we finally tried a property that had not been hunted as consistently.  After perhaps only an hour on the property, an impressive impala stepped into view at 150 yards.  A perfect opportunity, if we could only get the ram to step clear of his compadres.  That was when the fever kicked in.  I started getting wobbly and couldn’t slow my breathing.  I will never tire of the adrenaline rush of hunting.  But the timing was not good.  I tried to calm myself as I slowly squeezed off a shot.  I instantly knew it was a clean miss.  Careful checking verified what I had suspected. 

So I gathered my pride and followed my PH in the direction of more mating calls about a mile into the bush.  It was like trying to follow a flock of birds through the forest.  As soon as we would get close, they would move out of range and behind more thorn bush.  Finally, we zeroed in on a second group of impala that we could see through a thicket of trees.  No more than 50 yards away, not only did we not have a clear shot, but the group did not hold a single mature male.  What we had failed to noticed was an old ram sneaking in on the herd from behind us.  Suddenly, Pieter turned and whispered an emphatic “shoot that one.”  I turned to see an great ram 25 yards behind us in the trees and closing fast.  I waited for him to step into a shooting window and fired a shot into the shoulder. A short and anxious tracking job, a fabulous record book animal and one exited hunter.  Perhaps one of the most elegant of all african shoulder mounts, Jennifer can’t wait to add this one to the collection.

Marco Polo Sheep-the “Holy Grail” of Hunting

Posted in Big Game, Bighorn Sheep, Guides and Outfitters, guides and outfitters, International, International Hunting Adventures, World's Best with tags on January 22, 2010 by thegreatwhitehunter

Marco Polo Sheep are unquestionably one of the world’s most sought after big game trophies.  A subspecies of the Asian Argali, the horn length of the Marco Polo Sheep are unmatched .  The top of the world hunting experience in one of the most unique places on earth makes Marco Polo Sheep hunting a truly unmatched pursuit.  These sheep are huge in the body with mature rams weighing in at almost 300 lbs.  The longest recorded horn of any Marco Polo measured an almost inconceivable 6.2 feet and weighed 60 lbs.    It is not unusual for the typical hunter to harvest 50+ inch rams with multiple curls.  Thanks to Greg Rodriguez of Global Adventure Outfitters for use of the photo.  Contact Greg directly at http://www.mbogo.net/asia.html for more information on one of these fabulous hunts.

I found it interesting that of all of the Great White Hunter Posts, this is the first post of an Asian hunt.  The vast majority of Marco Polo Sheep are found in the Pamir Mountains adjacent the borders of Afghanistan, Pakistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and China.   With the only hunt able populations being found in Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan.  I previously wrote about harvests by the “typical hunter,” however, these animals and these hunts are anything but typical.  One of the world’s great adventures, many Marco Polo hunts are conducted at elevations of 14,000 to 16,000 feet.  While horses and off road vehicles are helpful, great physical conditioning and a willingness to push oneself are critical to get in range of a mature ram.  Given the open country, long range shots of 350 to 500 plus yards are not uncommon.  Add to these difficulties the extensive travel, limited number of U.S. import permits and a price tag of $25,000 or more …it becomes clear why a Marco Polo ram is truly the hunt of a lifetime.  Add a beautiful and “inexpensive” Ibex, another of the high mountain horned giants, for perhaps the best combined hunt the world has to offer.

If you are lucky enough to book one of these hunts with Greg Rodriguez please let us know.  As a outdoor writer and an award-wining wildlife photographer, Greg literally hunts on a constant basis with the best guides and outfitters in the world. Greg has put together an impressive list of the world’s top hunt offerings through Global Adventure Outfitters.  Check out his website at http://www.mbogo.net/

Oldy but a goody-Dead Deer Walking

Posted in Big Game, Cougar, Deer, Predators with tags on January 14, 2010 by thegreatwhitehunter

I can’t tell you the number of different people who have sent me this photo over the last couple of years.  Hard to tell if it is doctored.  This is the description that was forwarded by email: “This picture is from Leota Michigan. Beaver Tom, set out a motion sensor camera to see if any big bucks were passing in the area. “

Thanks to Jerry Clutter for the forward.  Click on the photo above for one of the older posts of a mountain lion attacking a bighorn sheep.

European Trout Fishing-Slovenia

Posted in Fish, Freshwater, International with tags on January 12, 2010 by thegreatwhitehunter

The beautiful country of Slovenia in the former Yugoslavia is one of the unexpected jewels of trout fishing.  Located adjacent to Italy on the North Eastern Coast of the Adriatic Sea, this beautiful country boasts my parents favorite European City (Bled-I think I spelled that correctly).  It is also home to the beautiful Marble Trout.  Thanks to Beaver at www.frontierstravel.com for use of the fabulous pictures. 

If you are in southern Europe and have an extra couple of days, try out some of this beautiful Alpine fishing.

Contact Frontiers International Travel at www.frontierstravel.com for information and booking of one of the fabulous adventures.

Frontiers International Travel; PO Box 959; Wexford, PA  15090-0959-Telephone: 724-935-1577;  Toll-free U.S.:  800-245-1950

World Record Caribou-Artic Hunting Group

Posted in Big Game, caribou, International, Trophies, World's Best with tags on December 2, 2009 by thegreatwhitehunter

Folks, there is a pending new world record caribou which was harvested in 2008 with Artic Hunting Group in Greenland.  Check out the unusual antler confirmation on this beautiful animal.  Scoring an incredible 534 1/8 SCI, Bob Theer has harvested a World Record Central Canada Caribou for the ages.  Visit Artic Hunting Group’s website http://arctic-hunting-group.com/ for more details on their world class Caribou and Muskox hunts.  Thanks Tony for use of the photo!

Russian World Record Moose-Kamchtka Pennisula

Posted in Big Game, guides and outfitters, International, Moose, Outdoor Adventures, Trophies with tags on November 29, 2009 by thegreatwhitehunter

This is one exceptional moose.  Just look at the Paddles on this bad boy.  Estimated to be a new world record.  To see more photos follow the link http://www.jerrysbaitandtackle.com/Trophies/Moose/WorldRecord.htm

 To read more about this moose harvested by hunter Jay Link, see http://www.blackbearheaven.com/world-record-moose/world-record-moose.htm

I particularly liked this quote, “This was one of the toughest hunts I have been on through my travels around the world. I refer to the hunt as a ‘tough man’s contest,’ rather then a hunt. It was a great experience. My brother Troy will be returning next year. As to the score of the moose, it should end up somewhere between 550 and 600 points SCI. It has huge mass and extremely wide paddles, with 20 points on one side and 18 points on the other.”

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